The Cost of a DWI

About Thursday of last week I received a call from a reporter for a weekly newspaper out of New Brighton, MN. I didn’t make a note of the name of the newspaper; and now when I run a Google to find it, I find that there seem to be two of them. The reporter said she was working on an article that they were going to publish in their St. Patrick’s Day edition on the subject of the cost of having a DWI. The topic was coming up because the local police in that area were letting it be known that they would be out in full force over St. Patrick’s Day (Monday, March 17th) and the weekend leading up to it.

The reporter wanted me to run through with her a list of the expenses that a drunk driver can expect to pay as a result of being arrested. What that would come to depends on quite a variety of factors. I said the easiest place to start would be with the case of a first time offender who we presume has a relatively low breath test reading. The reporter indicated that she thought she would limit her article to the first offense, and not even get into what might happen on subsequent offenses.

I indicated that the arrested party could expect, among other things, expenses for the following:

  • getting the car out of impound,
  • reinstating the driver’s license,
  • an alcohol assessment interview,
  • a class,
  • a meeting of Mother’s Against Drunk Driving,
  • a fine with surcharge,
  • perhaps a probation fee,
  • and of course an attorney’s fee.

When added up, using about the lowest and most optimistic numbers possible, the total came to about $3,000. That number does not include all sorts of additional items one might run in to, such as increased automobile insurance cost. I told the reporter that in my experience, a surprisingly large number of my first time offender clients report to me that their insurance did not go up. The reason for that is apparently that the insurance company never noticed it; or by the time they noticed it, the DWI was really old news.

I usually recommend that my client try to go at least three years without doing a thing that might attract the attention of his or her automobile insurance company. That can be difficult or impossible for many people. I say don’t sell or buy a car, don’t be late on paying the premiums, don’t have an accident or any claims, and don’t change insurance companies. Besides that, it would be good to not move and not add or subtract any drivers.

The most obvious problem with just putting a number, any number, on the cost of a DWI is that this is an item that will be on the person’s record for the rest of their life. How does one put a value on that? So looking back on that phone conversation I wish I had been more careful and said something like: The benefit of not having this on your record is really priceless, and the exact cost is impossible to calculate.

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